A program of the Office of Undergraduate Research and Scholarships

About the Program

The SURF Program is made up of three different fellowships:

Each fellowship has particular eligibility requirements, and each fellowship has certain obligations that fellows agree to if they receive the award. 

Applications for SURF L&S fellowships are now closed. Applications for summer 2017 will become avaiable in late in the fall 2016 semester. 

The SURF L&S fellowship allows UC Berkeley undergraduates in the College of Letters and Science to spend the summer doing concentrated research in preparation for a senior thesis. Fellows receive approximately $4000. These fellowships are generously supported by a number of private donors. 

The SURF Rose Hills Experience fellowship allows UC Berkeley sophomores and juniors in certain math, science, and engineering majors (L&S, CNR, COE, C. Chem) to immerse themselves in full-time summer research supporting a research project that is designed and directed by a faculty member. Fellows receive approximately $6000. This program is generously supported by the Rose Hills Foundation. 

The SURF Rose Hills Independent fellowship is for UC Berkeley juniors in the summer before their senior year who are intending to do research projects of their own design as part of a senior thesis for a major. Graduating seniors are also eligible. Fellows receive approximately $6000... more

Meet Our SURF & Rose Hills Fellows

Uncanny Narratives of Gendered Trauma in Oh Jung-hee’s "The Yard of Childhood"

Julie Lee : English

According to the author herself, Oh Jung-hee’s 1981 short story collection 『유년의 뜰』 ("The Yard of Childhood") “took the form of a novel sequence” when she rearranged eight of her previously published stories by protagonist age. The sequence, however unplanned, elegiacally traces the compressed post-war development of South Korea in the 1950s-70s—all through the anonymous coming-of-age story of an impoverished girl who becomes an alienated housewife haunted by her past. My research, then, engages in a close reading of Oh through the lens of literary trauma theory, examining how the psychological process of reparation re-presents traumatic memory as narrative memory. I’m especially drawn to the interplay between Oh’s use of linguistic and diegetic repetition, intertextuality, and the... Read More