A program of the Office of Undergraduate Research and Scholarships

About the Program

The SURF Program is made up of three different fellowships:

Each fellowship has particular eligibility requirements, and each fellowship has certain obligations that fellows agree to if they receive the award. 

Applications for SURF fellowships for the summer 2017 are closed. Applications for summer 2018 will open up in November with a early February deadline. To best understand the program and prepare a quality application we encourage you to:

  • attend an info session before applying. See "Resources" Tab for info sessions specifics or the OURS calendar
  • attend a workshop on how to write a research proposal. See OURS calender for time and place.
  • You are also encouraged to meet with the SURF advisors to discuss your project and application. Sign up for Justin (STEM) or Melissa (Social Sciene and Humanities) via the advisor information under the "Resources" tab. 

The SURF L&S fellowship allows UC Berkeley undergraduates in the College of Letters and Science to spend the summer doing concentrated research in preparation for a senior thesis. Fellows receive $4000. These fellowships are generously supported by a number of private donors. 

The SURF Rose Hills Experience fellowship... more

Meet Our SURF & Rose Hills Fellows

Morphological Changes in Dopamine Neurons Resulting From Tsc1 deletion

Malcolm Crawford : MCB - Neurobiology

Dopamine is an important neuromodulator, and dysregulation of dopaminergic function is involved in many neurological disorders, from Parkinson’s disease to addiction. The mTOR pathway, a ubiquitous signaling pathway which regulates cell growth and survival, plays an important role in dopamine neuron fate. By manipulating mTOR signaling in dopamine neurons via cell-type specific deletion of the Tsc1 gene, a negative regulator of the mTOR complex, I am examining how changes in cell morphology and protein expression levels are impacted by mTOR hyper-activation. This work can contribute to a better understanding of the mechanism governing several neurological diseases, including tuberous sclerosis complex and autism spectrum disorder.