Multimodality and the Post-9/11 Trauma Narrative in Jonathan Safran Foer's Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close

Summer 2011

Trisha Remetir : English

Mentor: Katherine Snyder, English

After September 11, American author Don Delillo announced: "Many things are over. The narrative ends in the rubble, and it is left to us to create the counter-narrative." Although a multitude of literary, psychoanalytic and political discourse has speculated on how, years after the fact, we now tell the "story" of 9/11, a cohesive picture of this counter-narrative remains unclear. By using Jonathan Safran Foer's Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close (a novel whose fragmented speakers struggle to reconcile their pre- and post-9/11 traumatic experiences) as a springboard for my research, I will explore how postmodern literary techniques have changed, interacted with, and transformed the genre of the trauma narrative in the post-9/11 world.

As an English major, I've always been interested in how world events affect modern narrative movements. This grant allows me to fully delve into contemporary literary criticism that is highly relevant to today's world. Receiving SURF will not only help me gather research for my honor's thesis for the fall, but in the long-term I believe this fellowship will allow me to explore a concentration I hope to pursue in graduate school.