SURF

Sarah Soliman

Probing the Necessity of Intestinal Stem Cells for Renewal of the Adult Drosophila Midgut

In adult animals, many tissues undergo continuous renewal, a process in which older cells die and are replaced by newly born cells. These new cells are generated by the proliferation of tissue stem cells, which divide continuously throughout the animal’s lifetime. The process of tissue self-renewal has long been thought essential for the maintenance of tissue structure and function; however, this presumption has never been explicitly examined. In my SURF project, I will explore the necessity of tissue renewal using the Drosophila epithelial midgut as a model system. Specifically, my research entails the genetic elimination of Drosophila intestinal stem cells and determining the effects of stem cell loss on the structure and function of the midgut.

Message to Sponsor

These days, in our fast-paced society, it is quite a rare treat to have the opportunity to devote time purely to research. It is an experience meant to stimulate and facilitate my intellectual and personal growth as I aspire to be a prominent scientist. With that prospect in mind, I look forward to the excitement and thrill associated with uncovering new findings along with the possibility of maneuvering through potential obstacles I may encounter in doing my research this summer. I am fortunate that through SURF and the Bilder lab I can further continue my expedition in the realm of scientific research.
  • Major: Molecular and Cell Biology
  • Mentor: David Bilder, Molecular and Cell Biology