SURF

Sara Smith

Targeted Gene Editing in Cheese-Rind Microbial Community

Microbial communities are ubiquitous and intimately involved in environmental cycles, human health, and industrial processes. Despite the fact that microbes live in diverse microbiomes, much of our knowledge about them comes from studying isolates. This creates gaps in understanding of how microbes interact with each other in communities.
One such interaction is the production of siderophores in low iron environments. Iron is required for essential functions such as respiration and DNA synthesis. Siderophores, small iron chelating molecules excreted into the environment, are the most prevalent method bacteria use to scavenge iron. This process is dependent on community interaction because some microorganisms are able to acquire iron using siderophores produced by a different species. My project will investigate this siderophore “cheating” and its effect on the fitness of members in the microbial community of the cheese rind. This work will be conducted through observational sequence-based approaches as well as perturbing the process genetically. This project aims to increase understanding of community interactions and advance the use of gene editing in microbial communities.

Message to Sponsor

Thank you so much for supporting my fellowship! Your gift is enabling me to spend the summer researching a topic I think is very exciting. This experience will be valuable for my future career.
  • Major: Bioengineering
  • Sponsor: Rose Hill Foundation
  • Mentor: Ben Rubin