Millimeter scale CMOS imager

Summer 2017

Amanda Tomlinson : Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS)

Mentor: Kris Pister

Technology has improved many aspects of our lives, but some of the largest changes have come in medicine. One large area of improvement is developing sensors that continuously monitor human health. These sensors need to be small enough to be non-invasive, and be low power so they can be used for a long time without being replaced. The aim of my research is to design and fabricate a small (2mm x 2mm), low power CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) camera to use in MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems). Lower power consumption will make the camera integrate easily into products that run on battery or need to dedicate resources to wireless communication or other tasks. Its small size will allow it to be used in medical observation, “smart” buildings or any other application with size or power constraints.

I would like to sincerely thank my donor for the opportunity to immerse myself in research this summer. Without this funding I would not have had a chance to experience research at this university! I am a transfer student and therefore only had 5 semesters to be here at Berkeley. Working on research this summer gave me more confidence to go into the industry and know that I can complete a major project. Thanks again!